Good-Bye XP. Hello Windows 7

 

Microsoft has wanted to kill Windows XP for years. There was only one problem. The users refused to let it die. Now, that Windows 7 is almost ready to go, Microsoft is, once more, trying to ax XP.

Microsoft did this to themselves. Vista was a flop. Even now, according to Net Applications’ Market Share, Vista has only a lousy 23% of the desktop market. For a while, Microsoft ignored the fact that even their own executives were horrified by just how bad Vista was. But, then the Linux-powered netbook came along, and Microsoft was frightened enough by its early successes that it un-retired Windows XP Home.

Now, Microsoft wants to kill off XP again. Step one will be bringing free support for XP to a close on April 14th. Step two is letting anyone and their uncle get a free copy of the Windows 7 release candidate sometime in May. The timing is by design. Continue reading

Pwn2Own contest winner: Macs are safer than Windows

    

Charlie Miller, the security expert who won both this and last year’s CanSecWest Pwn2Own security contests by exploiting Macs running Safari, repeated in an interview that he’d recommend Macs to typical users as a safer alternative to Windows PCs.

Following both Pwn2Own contests, numerous sensationalist headlines played up the idea that a Mac had been “cracked in seconds,” conspicuously neglecting to mention what Miller called “the many days doing research and writing the exploit before the day of the competition,” enabling him to discover the bugs and develop a way to successfully exploit them on the first try at the event. Continue reading

Is this Windows Mobile 7?

 

                                 wm71

                                 wm72

 

A kind tipster send us this screen shots of what purports to be Windows Mobile 7. The latest inside rumours put the OS as being available to OEM’s by the end of 2009 and out on devices by Spring 2010. 

From what I have heard so far, it sounds worth the wait.

 

Via[wmpoweruser.com]

Serv-U Corporate Edition v8.0.0.1 FTP Server

Serv-U is a powerful and easy-to-use File Server. Serv-U supports the FTP, HTTP, and SFTP (via SSH2) protocols to ensure maximum compatibility with the widest range of transfer client software. With support for industry-standard SSL encryption, Serv-U protects your data while it’s in transit. A powerful Web-based interface allows administrators to remotely access and configure the File Server from any Internet connection in the world using their Web browser. Serv-U also includes a built-in transfer client allowing users to upload and download files from their Web browser. Combined with advanced photo sharing capabilities, Serv-U is an excellent solution for sharing images with friends, family, and colleagues. By licensing FTP Voyager JV with Serv-U, a full-featured transfer client becomes available to all users with no extra installation required. Because FTP Voyager JV is written using Java technology, it’s a cross-platform solution for enterprises. Continue reading

Floola 5.0 Final,copy songs to iPod

                                                    
Floola is a freeware application to efficiently manage your iPod or your Motorola mobile phone (any model supporting iTunes except iPhone and iPod touch). It’s a standalone application that can be run directly from your iPod and needs no installation under Linux (any GTK2 distro)Mac OS X (10.3.9 or newer!) andWindows (98 or newer, including Vista).Manage Music, Videos, Podcast and Photos all in one simple app, anywhere on any computer.
Features

Floola supports almost all features offered by iPods including photosartwork,podcasts and smart playlists!

It automatically converts any incompatible audio or video file so that you can copy almost any file to it. It allows adding youtube and myspace videos with a single click. Now it even makes it possible to keep your Google calendars synched!  

Take a look at the feature list to find out what it can do and feel free to suggest anything that might be missing.

Cross plattform
Works on any Windows (98 and above), any Mac and any linux distribution with GTK installed.

 Portable
Put the application on iPod and launch it on any PC, immediately.

 Copy
add and extract songs to and from iPod.

 

 Playlists
Easily manage, import and export (m3u, pls) playlists.

 Last.fm
Join the social music revolution.

 Podcasts
Join the social music revolution.

 

 Web videos
add files to iPod just copying the page url

 Localization
Available in different languages.

 Lyrics
Lyric support even on older iPods (3G and above).

 Search for duplicates
Easily find duplicated songs on iPod.

 

 Search lost files
Easily find songs lost in your iPod.

 Artwork
Add artwork to your songs easily.

 Videos
Videos can be added to iPod.

 Convert
Convert audio and video incompatible formats

 Google Calendars
Synchronize them easily 

 Export to HTML
Create HTML files containing list of your iPod files

 Fix iPod
Did a software mess up your iPod? Fix it!

 Notes
Manage notes.

 Growl support
(Mac version only) Get beautiful system notifications.

 Snarl support
(Windows version only) Get beautiful system notifications.

 Music
Play iPod’s music.

 Photos
Freedom to simply add photos to iPod.

 

Download Now 

Floola v5.0 for Windows

Floola v5.0 for Linux

Floola v5.0 for Mac

 

 

 

 

Apple Safari Beta 4 for Windows and Mac

                                

Apple launched the first beta of Safari 4, the new version of its web browser for both Windows and Mac OS X computers. Safari 4 brings a lot of new features, including full history search, a smart address field, and full-page zoom. Apple also claims that Safari 4 runs much faster due to its new JavaScript engine.

  Continue reading

Do we need a unified Linux front?

The U.S. Constitution makes a point of guarding against tyranny through a series of checks and balances. The software market, it turns out, is no different.

Or, rather, it could turn out to be that way. Windows has stood alone for more than a decade as the dominant operating system for personal computers, and it had a growing lock on the server too. But then Linux happened, and Apple’s Mac OS X is increasingly spoiling the Windows party (though some recent data suggests that Microsoft’s “I’m a PC” marketing may have actually paid off).

Linux provides an effective check on Microsoft’s ambitions to own the operating-system market. The question then becomes: how many Linux distributions is optimal for keeping Microsoft honest?

Paul Rubens at ServerWatch makes a compelling argument that one Linux is better than many for the purpose of keeping Windows in check, and the clear candidate to take that mantle is Red Hat, not Novell’s Suse Linux. He explains:

Some might say SLES (Suse Linux Enterprise Server) is the obvious candidate in that it’s backed by Novell, and with other strings to its bow, Novell should be better able to withstand any price wars or other financial problems a Linux champion might encounter. But there’s a problem with this argument. Over the years, Novell has comprehensively had its (rear) whipped by Microsoft. What it comes down to is this: Microsoft is a winner while Novell is a perennial loser.

But it gets worse. Novell, as we all know, is in Microsoft’s back pocket when it comes to SLES. The Redmond giant subsidizes SLES by buying support coupons off Novell (it’s committed to up to $340 million worth so far), which it uses to get Microsoft customers who are interested in Linux to spurn Red Hat.

Novell, in other words, is not a good counterbalance to Microsoft, because it’s somewhat dependent on Microsoft. The VAR Guy rightly suggests that a strong showing by Novell’s Suse Linux is critical to ensuring that Red Hat doesn’t become Redmond, but this point is mitigated by Novell’s affiliation with Microsoft.

Red Hat, however, has not actively taken the fight to Microsoft, and it needs to expand its solution footprint in order to effectively compete with Microsoft. Microsoft is much more than an operating-system company. Red Hat has started to build out its portfolio with JBoss, but more is needed.

Once Red Hat lives up to its brand and expands its range of offerings, we’ll have a real competitor to Microsoft, rather than the Unix-and-BEA-replacement company that Red Hat largely is today. As for keeping Red Hat honest, I suspect that Canonical’s Ubuntu will play that role, rather than Novell. Novell needs to shed its too-close affiliation with Microsoft in order to effectively counterbalance Microsoft and Red Hat.